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-- including u.s. government officials who in 2007 publicly stated that problems in the subprime market appeared to be contained." >> reporter: s&p goes on to argue that the securities at issue in the justice department's case were reviewed by another ratings agency and received the same rating. s&p says it also began downgrading many mortgage securities in 2006, warning that conditions in the housing market were deteriorating. but critics say what matters is what s&p claimed at the time it stamped securities triple a. >> the ratings agencies claim that they have unique analytic abilities and very sophisticated models that enable them to determine the credit worthiness of a bond, a derivative, a security. >> reporter: s&p points out court rulings have dismissed what it called challenges to a credit rating made with 20/20 hindsight. if the justice department does sue, standard and poor's says it will vigorously defend itself. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: consumers, the street.com's david peltier joins us with some consumer product
industry. >> susie: the u.s. government wants as much as $5 billion from standard and poors, officially accusing the credit ratings agency of fraud during the housing boom. >> tom: and earnings from a trio of consumer stocks finds us spending money on eating out and watching tv. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: a bold new chapter for computer maker dell was opened today. michael dell said today he's taking the company he founded almost 30 years ago private. it's a $24.5 billion deal offering dell investors $13.65 per share. now, at one point, dell was the largest p.c. maker in the world, boasting market capitalization of more than $100 billion. now, it sits behind apple, hewlett packard and lenovo, valued a fifth of what it once was. ruben ramirez begins are coverage. >> reporter: michael dell admits he missed the consumer shift away from the p.c. to tablets and smartphones, but today's announcement his company is going private doesn't necessary address how dell is going to try to capture those markets. >> they want to continue to be a hardware player, but the questio
by groups opposed to economic reform, on top of that, u.s. equities face a looming friday deadline for massive government budget cuts, known as "sequestration." the dow tumbled 216 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 46, and the s&p 500 lost 28 points. while there's been much talk of a correction in the stock market, sequestration may not be the catalyst. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: it is widely accepted on wall street that sequestration is coming. and, with it a new reason for the fragile u.s. economy to sputter. but, what will the first phase of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts actually do to the u.s. stock market? after all, major market averages are hovering close to all-time highs, and don't forget investors are finally warming up to equities again. floor broker art cashin says today's selling was mostly a reaction to italy's election, and that the stock market is not yet focused on sequestration. >> i don't think that even we slip into sequestration it will have the same dramatic effect that the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling had. it is seen as somewhat temp
saying, "we think our stock is overvalued, let's use it while we can to buy the competition." >> reporter: there may be a lot more corporate marriages in the months ahead, but stovall says the stock market still needs to digest its recent gains. >> i think that we could end up seeing a relatively mild correction in prices, something on the order of 5% or maybe more. but then we're going to see a lot of investors say, "it's time to jump back in because i missed most of this move." >> reporter: stovall also says any stock market correction needs a trigger. what that may be, however, is anyone's guess. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: dell is among those companies involved in the deal- making this year. its founder and a group of investors wants to take dell private. in the meantime, the company reported better than expected quarterly earnings late today. dell earned 40 cents per share last quarter. while that's down considerably from a year ago, it is slightly better than wall street estimates. still, business continues to be tough. the lone business dell saw revenue grow last qua
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4